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With widespread participation in the Horton DNA Project, some day all of the Hortons can be linked together and none of us will have to spend precious time searching and “connecting the dots.”  Instead, we can dedicate ourselves to understanding our ancestors, their lives, and their place in the history of the world.

At the time of this writing, www.FamilyTreeDNA.com had 89 male Horton participants (a father, grandfather, uncle, or male cousin with the Horton surname), who have taken a cheek swab and submitted their DNA sample to the study.  The part of the DNA tested by Family Tree DNA is NOT the same part of the DNA used for forensic analysis or disease theory.  Genealogy studies use junk DNA whose only known application is by population geneticists studying the migrations of ancient peoples, and by genealogists learning about their origins. 

DNA studies are growing, as more genealogists learn about their value.  After you participate, there is a possibility that you may be notified of another participant in the study who shares your markers and is related to you.  The more markers that you test for (67 or more), the closer the relative identified will be to you.  As the study grows, the chances of finding a “cousin” will also multiply.  Family Tree DNA will keep your test results on file for 25 years, so your quest to find matches will live on, and you or your relative who carries on the genealogy tradition will be notified about others who match your DNA, long into the future.  To share your test results and allow generations to come to match your DNA, you can post your results, free on several websites in addition to FamilyTreeDNA.com (definitely Gedmatch and Ancestry.com), leaving not only your e-mail and phone contact information, but also that of a younger generation.

You may want to read Trace Your Roots with DNA by Megan Smoenyak to learn more, like I did.  It is fascinating and enlightening!  Please consider joining the Horton DNA Study.  By joining a study, you receive a discount on the DNA test.  You may contact www.FamilyTreeDNA.com for more details about participating in the current study or read the information that follows.  What a terrific birthday or Christmas present for a genealogist.  It’s the gift that keeps on giving!

 

SEE IF YOU ARE A MATCH

The Haplogroup is:     R1b1
The results of a 67-marker test for the Horton branch found on this website is: 

PANEL 1 (1-12)
DYS
393
390
19
391
385a
426
388
439
389-1
389-1
392
389-2
Allele
13
24
15
11
11-13
12
12
11
13
13
13
29
 
PANEL 2 (13-25)
DYS
458
459
455
454
447
437
448
449
464
Alleles
18
9-10
11
11
25
15
19
31
15-16-17-17

 

 
PANEL 3 (26-37)
DYS
460
GATA H4
YCA II a
456
607
576
570
CDY
442
438
Alleles
11
11
19-23
15
15
17
17
35-37
12
12

 

 
PANEL 4 (38-46)
DYS
531
578

395S1

590 537 641 472 406S1 511
Alleles
11
9 15-16 8 10 10 8 10 10

 

 
PANEL 5 (47-60)
DYS
425
413 557 594 436 490 534 450 444 481 520 446
Alleles
12
21-23 16 10 12 12 15 8 12 23 20 13

 

 
PANEL 6 (60-67)
DYS
617
568 487 572 640 492 565
Alleles
12
10 13 11 11 13 12

 

 

HORTON DNA SURNAME PROJECT INFORMATION

 

PROJECT PARTICIPATION

Participation in Y-DNA testing for the purpose of genealogical research is limited to male members of the line who carry the Horton name.  Y-DNA is passed from father to sons through many generations.  This Y-DNA test is NOT the same test that is used for identification in criminal cases.  Family members with different surnames may wish to help sponsor the cost of a test for a father, brother or cousin.  Each participant will be required to submit his line of descent from his earliest proven ancestor.  This could be two or more generations of Hortons you have already compiled into a family tree.  Participants will be asked to complete an information release form indicating what information may be published on the Horton Surname Project:  name, e-mail, lineage, DNA results.  The form will be e-mailed or mailed to each new participant.  Be sure to publish as much as possible so I can see if we are a match.

Our Horton project administrator has identified 8 different Horton patriarchs.  He will notify you who the patriarch of your family is.  From that point you can find published materials and make valid inquiries about your ancestors, knowing for sure that you are on the right trail, thereby avoiding false leads and hours of wasted research.

My husband is descended from Barnabas Horton, 1600-16.

 

THE TEST

The Horton Surname Project has chosen the Family Tree DNA Service of Houston, Texas, because of the excellent reputation it has in the field.  I have been using their services for 13 years.

Y-DNA tests are available as 12, 25, 37, 67 and 111 marker tests.  I recommend the 67 marker, but the 37 marker test can be valuable.  When markers of two or more HORTON males match, it is an indication that they share a common ancestor named HORTON, at some point back in time.  The more markers that are tested and match, the more likely that that match is within a genealogical timeframe.

Exact 25 marker matches predict a 95% chance of sharing a common ancestor in 13 generations.  Exact 37 marker matches indicate a common ancestor within about 7 generations.  For more information about which test to choose see: "How Many Markers to Test?"  There is a new prediction chart showing the possible generational relationships that can be expected.  Go to http://www.ftdna.com/faq2.html

After joining the project, the participant will receive a testing kit in the mail.  The process involves scraping cells from the inside of the cheek and returning the samples by following the instructions that come with the kit.  The test samples are kept for a period of 25 years.  Other tests may be ordered during that time without providing further samples.

 

THE COST

Group prices for the Y-DNA Male tests for this project are:
12 Marker Paternal Test - $99
25 Marker Paternal Test - $124
37 Marker Paternal Test - $119
67 Marker Paternal Test - $218

Refine 12 to 25 markers - $49
Refine 12 to 37 markers - $99
Refine 12 to 67 markers - $189

There will be a $2 shipping fee added to the price on each test.  The lab also offers other types of DNA testing, which can be linked from the Join the Project Page at http://www.familytreemakerdna.com.

Contact with additional questions:  Project Administrator, Jeff Horton at jeff.horton@OSO-ink.com.

 

HELPFUL LINKS

Time to Most Recent Common Ancestry Calculator by Bruce Walsh. The goal is to use genetic markers (here on the Y chromosome) to estimate the TMRCA, the Time to the Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA), which is how many generations the two Y chromosomes are from a common ancestor. This site explains the various models used to determine TMRCA.

The National Human Genome Research Institute - The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help people without scientific backgrounds understand the terms and concepts used in genetic research.

Human Genome Project Information - The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international effort to discover all the approximately 30,000 to 35,000 human genes (the human genome), make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of the 3 billion DNA subunits (bases).

Genetics & Genealogy: Y Chromosome DNA and the Y Line - by Thomas H. Roderick, PhD, Center for Human Genetics. A discussion of the Y-Chromosome and its role in DNA as tool for genealogists.

 

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