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With widespread participation in the Horton DNA Project, some day all of the Hortons can be linked together and none of us will have to spend precious time searching and “connecting the dots.”  Instead, we can dedicate ourselves to understanding our ancestors, their lives, and their place in the history of the world.

At the time of this writing, www.FamilyTreeDNA.com had 89 male Horton participants (a father, grandfather, uncle, or male cousin with the Horton surname), who have taken a cheek swab and submitted their DNA sample to the study.  The part of the DNA tested by Family Tree DNA is NOT the same part of the DNA used for forensic analysis or disease theory.  Genealogy studies use junk DNA whose only known application is by population geneticists studying the migrations of ancient peoples, and by genealogists learning about their origins. 

Although the number is small, DNA studies are growing, as more genealogists learn about their value.  After you participate, there is a slim possibility that you may be notified of another participant in the study who shares your markers and is related to you.  The more markers that you test for (37 or more), the closer the relative identified will be to you.  As the study grows in the years to come, the chances of finding a “cousin” will also multiply.  Family Tree DNA will keep your test results on file for 25 years, so your quest to find matches will live on, and you or your relative who carries on the genealogy tradition will be notified about others who match your DNA, long into the future.  To perpetuate your test results and allow generations to come to match your DNA you can post your results on several websites, leaving not only your e-mail and phone contact information, but also that of a younger generation.

You may want to read Trace Your Roots with DNA by Megan Smoenyak to learn more, like I did.  It is fascinating and enlightening!  Please consider joining the Horton DNA Study.  By joining a study, you receive a discount on the DNA test.  You may contact www.FamilyTreeDNA.com for more details about participating in the current study or read the information that follows.  What a terrific birthday or Christmas present for a genealogist.  It’s the gift that keeps on giving!

 

SEE IF YOU ARE A MATCH

The Haplogroup is:     R1b1
The results of a 37-marker test for the Horton branch found on this website is: 

PANEL 1 (1-12)
Locus
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
DYS#
393
390
19*
391
385a
385b
426
388
439
389-1
392
389-2
Alleles
13
24
15
11
11
13
12
12
11
13
13
29
 
PANEL 2 (13-25)
Locus
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
DYS#
458
459a
459b
455
454
447
437
448
449
464a**
464b**
464c**
464d**
Alleles
18
9
10
11
11
25
15
19
31
15
16
17
17

 

 
PANEL 3 (26-37)
Locus
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
DYS#
460
GATA H4
YCA II a
YCA II b
456
607
576
570
CDY a
CDY b
442
438
Alleles
11
11
19
23
15
15
17
17
35
37
12
12

 

HORTON DNA SURNAME PROJECT INFORMATION

 

PROJECT PURPOSE

-Sort participants into family groups according to line of descent
-Determine ancient family origins

-Prove or disprove a research theory
-May provide contacts for further research when matches are found

 

PROJECT PARTICIPATION

Participation in Y-DNA testing for the purpose of genealogical research is limited to male members of the line who carry the Horton name.  Y-DNA is passed from father to sons through many generations.  This Y-DNA test is NOT the same test that is used for identification in criminal cases.  Family members with different surnames may wish to help sponsor the cost of a test for a father, brother or cousin.  Each participant will be required to submit his line of descent from his earliest proven ancestor.  Participants will be asked to complete an information release form indicating what information may be published on the Horton Surname Project:  name, e-mail, lineage, DNA results.  The form will be e-mailed or mailed to each new participant.

 

THE TEST

The Horton Surname Project has chosen the Family Tree DNA Service of Houston, Texas because of the excellent reputation it has in the field.

Y-DNA tests are available as 12, 25, 37 and 67 marker tests.  When markers of two or more HORTON males match, it is an indication that they share a common ancestor named HORTON, at some point back in time.  The 12  marker test places a participant in a particular Haplogroup and exact 12 matches predict a 95% chance of sharing a common ancestor in the last 29 generations.

Exact 25 marker matches predict a 95% chance of sharing a common ancestor in 13 generations.  Exact 37 marker matches indicate a common ancestor within about 7 generations.  For more information about which test to choose see: "How Many Markers to Test?"  There is a new prediction chart showing the possible generational relationships that can be expected.  Go to http://www.ftdna.com/faq2.html

Those choosing to begin with the 12 marker test may refine to 25, 37 or 67 marker tests at a later date, though the cost and waiting time will increase.  Participants in this project are encouraged to begin with the more useful and cost effective 37 marker test, if possible.

After joining the project, the participant will receive a testing kit in the mail.  The process involves scraping cells from the inside of the cheek and returning the samples by following the instructions that come with the kit.  The test samples are kept for a period of 25 years.  Other tests may be ordered during that time without providing further samples.

 

THE COST

Group prices for the Y-DNA Male tests for this project are:
12 Marker Paternal Test - $99
25 Marker Paternal Test - $124
37 Marker Paternal Test - $119
67 Marker Paternal Test - $218

Refine 12 to 25 markers - $49
Refine 12 to 37 markers - $99
Refine 12 to 67 markers - $189

There will be a $2 shipping fee added to the price on each test.  The lab also offers other types of DNA testing, which can be linked from the Join the Project Page at http://www.familytreemakerdna.com.

Contact with additional questions:  Project Administrator, Dan Wharton at pelhamdan@aol.com.

 

HELPFUL LINKS

http://blairdna.com/dna101.html - Overview of Y-Chromosome testing

International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG) - The first society founded to promote the use of DNA testing in genealogy! With links to a wealth of genetic genealogy tools and information.

Contexo.Info A website about the foundations of molecular genetics and biology. An excellent site for those who are looking more details on DNA.

Time to Most Recent Common Ancestry Calculator by Bruce Walsh. The goal is to use genetic markers (here on the Y chromosome) to estimate the TMRCA, the Time to the Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA), which is how many generations the two Y chromosomes are from a common ancestor. This site explains the various models used to determine TMRCA.

The National Human Genome Research Institute - The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help people without scientific backgrounds understand the terms and concepts used in genetic research.

Human Genome Project Information - The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international effort to discover all the approximately 30,000 to 35,000 human genes (the human genome), make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of the 3 billion DNA subunits (bases).

Primer on Molecular Genetics - This primer was prepared by Denise Casey, Human Genome Management Information System, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the 1991-92 DOE Human Genome Program Report.

Primer on Molecular Genetics (pdf format) - This is an adobe version of the primer above.

Why Y? The Y Chromosome in the Study of Human Evolution, Migration and Prehistory - Neil Bradman and Mark Thomas of The Centre for Genetic Anthropology at University College London reveal the power of modern genetic analysis for exploring the role of fathers in human history.

Genetics & Genealogy: Y Chromosome DNA and the Y Line - by Thomas H. Roderick, PhD, Center for Human Genetics. A discussion of the Y-Chromosome and its role in DNA as tool for genealogists.

Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet DataBase - While the use of STRs for genetic mapping and identity testing has become widespread among DNA typing laboratories, there is no single place where information may be found regarding STR systems. This web site is an attempt to bring together the abundant literature on the subject in a cohesive fashion to make future work in this field easier. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included in this database.

GENEALOGY-DNA-L - This mailing list is for anyone with DNA (i.e., anyone!) who would like to discuss methods and share results of DNA testing as applied to genealogical research.

Genetic Genealogy and Telephone Tag - A simplified explanation of how Y-DNA mutates.

 

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